RSS bericht

Abstract

Purpose

Our study provides data on depression and anxiety in long-term cancer survivors, in men, women and various age groups, as well as identifies associated factors and coping-related resources.

Methods

We present data obtained from 1002 cancer survivors across a large variety of tumour entities 5 years (cohort 1) and 10 years (cohort 2) after diagnosis, in a cross-sectional study. We analysed depression (PHQ-9) and anxiety (GAD-7) symptomatology in comparison with two large age- and sex-matched samples randomly selected from the general population.

Results

Moderate to severe depression and anxiety were reported in 17% and 9% of cancer survivors, respectively. There were no significant differences between the 5 years and 10 years after diagnosis cohorts (p = 0.232). In both cohorts, we found higher depression and anxiety in women than in men (p < 0.001), and lower depression and anxiety in elderly patients (p < 0.001). Cancer survivors younger than 60 years of age were more depressed and anxious than the general population (p < 0.001). The variables, financial problems (Beta = 0.16, p < 0.001), global quality of life (Beta = − 0.21, p < 0.001) and cognitive function (Beta = − 0.30, p < 0.001), had the strongest association with depression and anxiety.

Conclusions

For the prevention of depression and anxiety in long-term cancer survivors, individual treatment of physical and psychological symptoms is as important as social support and professional counselling. Post-treatment, cognitive limitations should be carefully assessed in long-term cancer survivorship to distinguish them from symptoms of a mental disorder, especially since younger cancer survivors of working age and female survivors seem to be more affected by depression and anxiety.

Abstract

Purpose

Our study provides data on depression and anxiety in long-term cancer survivors, in men, women and various age groups, as well as identifies associated factors and coping-related resources.

Methods

We present data obtained from 1002 cancer survivors across a large variety of tumour entities 5 years (cohort 1) and 10 years (cohort 2) after diagnosis, in a cross-sectional study. We analysed depression (PHQ-9) and anxiety (GAD-7) symptomatology in comparison with two large age- and sex-matched samples randomly selected from the general population.

Results

Moderate to severe depression and anxiety were reported in 17% and 9% of cancer survivors, respectively. There were no significant differences between the 5 years and 10 years after diagnosis cohorts (p = 0.232). In both cohorts, we found higher depression and anxiety in women than in men (p < 0.001), and lower depression and anxiety in elderly patients (p < 0.001). Cancer survivors younger than 60 years of age were more depressed and anxious than the general population (p < 0.001). The variables, financial problems (Beta = 0.16, p < 0.001), global quality of life (Beta = − 0.21, p < 0.001) and cognitive function (Beta = − 0.30, p < 0.001), had the strongest association with depression and anxiety.

Conclusions

For the prevention of depression and anxiety in long-term cancer survivors, individual treatment of physical and psychological symptoms is as important as social support and professional counselling. Post-treatment, cognitive limitations should be carefully assessed in long-term cancer survivorship to distinguish them from symptoms of a mental disorder, especially since younger cancer survivors of working age and female survivors seem to be more affected by depression and anxiety.