RSS bericht

Abstract

An emerging body of research finds that African American and Caribbean Black adolescents are highly susceptible to discrimination, which negatively affects their mental health. Exposure to discrimination appears to be more consequential for mental health among Caribbean Black adolescents; however, past research investigating the differential impact of perceived discrimination on the mental health of African American and Caribbean Black adolescents has failed to take into account parental nativity status. Using data from the National Survey of American Life-Adolescent Supplement (NSAL-A), 2001–2004, this research examines differences in mental health profiles among African American adolescents (n = 783) and Caribbean Black adolescents with US-born (n = 216) and immigrant parents (n = 144) and differential vulnerability to perceptions of discrimination. Findings suggest that Caribbean Black adolescents with immigrant parents report fewer depressive symptoms than African American adolescents. Caribbean Black adolescents with immigrant parents also perceive lower levels of discrimination than Caribbean Black adolescents with US-born parents. Generally, greater perceptions of discrimination were associated with diminished mental health among all adolescents; however, relative to African American adolescents, associations between perceived discrimination and both mental health indicators were augmented among Caribbean Black adolescents with immigrant parents. No differences were observed between African American adolescents and Caribbean Black adolescents with US-born parents. Theoretical and policy implications of these findings are discussed.